Research

The Center undertakes, encourages and advances scholarly political science-focused analysis, and public awareness, of the distinct history, development, and contemporary circumstances of Latina/o politics. The Center furthers the academic mission of the university in a number of ways: through cross-disciplinary collaborations within and across ASU units, the Center convenes experts to conduct innovative research that contributes to the learning about and the teaching of Latina/o politics, and create additional learning opportunities through expanded course offerings, events, and conferences that include the ASU and the wider community, underscoring its inclusiveness and public value.

Blog: The U.S./Mexican Border: How Often and Why Arizonans Cross Into Mexico - December 2018

In this brief, we examine recent data from the Center for Latina/os and American Politics Research (CLAPR) at Arizona State University to better understand who and why Arizonans are crossing into Mexico. The poll surveyed 775 total respondents, from September 10-25, 2018 and was administered by Latino Decisions.

PDF icon How Often and Why Arizonans Cross Into Mexico
Blog: Arizonans View Education Policy as a Major Issue - November 2018

In this brief, we will delve deeper into the importance of education in the Arizona political landscape and an innovative survey experiment that intersects education and immigration policy in the state. 

PDF icon Arizonans View Education Policy as a Major Issue
Arizona General Election Survey - October 2018

The Center for Latina/os and American Politics Research (CLAPR) at Arizona State University recently commissioned a statewide poll of Arizonans. The poll, administered by the polling firm Latino Decisions, surveyed 775 total respondents, including an oversample of Latina/os (N=411) from September 10-25.

Among the poll’s findings are that immigration is most frequently cited as “the most important issue” (37%) facing the state, followed by K-12 Education (28%), and Health Care (18%) among 610 registered voters.

PDF icon Arizona General Election Survey